Sample HR Management Essay Paper on A case study on Uniqlo

A case study on Uniqlo

Introduction

Uniqlo is a Japanese clothing retail company that specializes in manufacturing clothes for exportation. The company is expected to open its first store in Singapore and in south-east Asia at Orchard central. Upon opening the store, the company will create 300 jobs in the region. This is expected to make the company a giant company in clothing industry. In this respect, the company will focus its attention on retaining employees once it recruits them. At the same time, it will focus its attention on motivating employees to work hard so that they can improve their productivity for the company’s profitability and their own good. The company’s mission will be to conquer the region by producing quality products. Its vision will be to become the preferred company in the region. Its corporate objective will be to expand the company’s activities in the region with a view of becoming the regional market leader. The following report will be about what the company ought to do in recruiting and retaining employees. The first part deals with the selection strategy that the company should utilize to recruit employees. The second part deals with the strategies the company should utilize to motivate and retain employees once it recruits them. The third part proposes the budget for the company while the fourth part concludes the report.   

Recruitment strategies

Based on the nature of the labor market in Singapore, the company should recruit employees through newspaper advertisement. Newspaper advertisement in this case would involve creating job advertisements and posting those advertisements on newspapers. Although the rate of advertising on newspaper would be among the most expensive ones, it is among the most efficient methods in the region because it reaches more people (Cooper & Robertson 2001, p. 87). Other methods of advertisement such as online advertisement might be utilized, but they might not be as efficient as newspaper advertisement would be in reaching target job applicants. Therefore, newspaper advertisement would be the best method for the company to utilize in reaching job applicants. The following newspaper advertisement should be utilized and it should be posted on Friday, Saturday and Sunday because most of the jobs are posted on these days. As a result, majority of job seekers prefer reading newspapers on these days.

Regional branch manager

Job description

  • To manage employees at the branch on daily basis
  • To spearhead decision making processes at the regional branch
  • To maintain communication with Japanese headquarter
  • Provide weekly and monthly reports

Qualifications

  • Master’s degree in business administration
  • Six to ten years’ experience in the same position
  • Excellent written and verbal communication skills
  • Able to work under minimum supervision  

Specialized tailors

Job description

  • To maintain productivity guidelines
  • To follow instructions as provided by unit manager
  • Remove stitches from garments
  • Perform alterations on garments provided
  • Mark and measure alteration lines

Qualifications

  • A diploma in tailoring
  • Three to four years of experience in the same capacity
  • Ability to work under minimum supervision
  • Team players 

The rate for advertising on Friday might be slightly higher than the rate of advertising on Saturday and Sunday because other companies advertise their jobs on Fridays as well. This notwithstanding, the company is likely to reach more job applicants on Friday than it is likely to reach on Saturday and Sunday (Larson et al. 1998, p. 27). It has been decided that the company should advertise its job openings on three local newspapers namely the straits times, my paper and today. The company should advertise its job openings on the straits times on Friday, today’s newspaper on Saturday and my paper on Sunday. The rate for advertising on Saturday and Sunday are the same, but the rate of advertising on Friday is slightly higher as indicated on the budget below.    

Selection system/process

The selection process should focus much of its attention on academic performance and experience of the job applicants so that potential employees can be both knowledgeable and experienced. In this respect, the recruitment process should start by evaluating the academic level of the job applicants before evaluating their years of experience in the job. This does not mean that the company should recruit job applicants with no experience, but it means that the company should start by evaluating knowledge before proceeding to evaluate experience. Once the company is satisfied that job applicants have the requisite knowledge, it should proceed to evaluating their experiences (Warne 2003, p. 6). In this case, emphasis should be given to job applicants with many years of experience. As a result, qualified job applicants with many years of experience in the job should be invited for interviews. During the interviews, those tasked with recruiting employees should evaluate job applicants carefully so that they end up with the best employees.

Motivation and retention strategy

Theoretically, the Maslow’s hierarchy of needs claims that employees have different levels of needs to meet. The first level of needs deals with physiological needs. These include shelter, food and water, which are basic to every person. The needs are so basic that every employee needs them for survival. From a motivation viewpoint, every employee wishes to secure a job that can satisfy these needs. Therefore, offering better paying jobs is a plus to every company that wishes to recruit and retain employees. The second level of needs deals with safety needs. These are the needs that make employees feel safe whenever working for their employers. The needs are both mental and emotional in nature meaning that they might not be so physical. With regard to these needs, every employee should be assured that everything will be okay so long as he/she remains in the company. To some extent, this can be done through safe working conditions and through medical insurance. According to Montana and Charnov (2008, p. 239), every time employees attain physical comfort, they wish to establish consistency in chaotic world. This means that once they satisfy physiological needs, they progress to evaluating their safety in the company. If they feel that they are not safe, they might wish to move to safe companies. However, if they feel safe in the company, they might not be interested in looking for employment elsewhere (Pride, Hughes & Kapoor 2010, p. 283). The company’s board of management should understand this aspect so that it is able to retain employees once it recruits them.

The third level of needs deals with love and sense of belonging. The needs come into play once the other two levels of needs have been met. They include the desire for social contact, friendship and interaction. At workplaces, employees wish to interact with one another. Not because they do not have people to interact with outside, but because they would wish to develop their careers. In this respect, employers should develop mechanisms that encourage employees to interact with one another. This would help employees to consult one another when they need to do so. It would also help them to support one another. The fourth level deals with esteem needs that can be classified into self-esteem and recognition needs. The self-esteem needs result from competence and mastery of tasks whereas recognition needs results from desire for attention and recognition (Barrett 2003, p. 40). Almost every employee would wish to be recognized for what he/she does for the company. At the same time, almost every employee would wish to be appreciated for his/her competence. Based on this fact, it would be reasonable for the company to motivate employees in different ways. More importantly, it would be reasonable for the company to understand the specific ways it can motivate its employees. The fifth level deals with self-actualization needs. These needs help one to become what he/she wishes to become in life. At workplace, they help employees to become the people they wish to become in their lines of duty. Depending on individuals, these needs can take different forms. They might include self-fulfillment, understanding, knowledge, peace and beauty. When employees achieve all they wish to achieve, they might be tempted to pursue these needs so that they can develop their careers. The needs have nothing to do with money, but they have much to do with personality (Montana & Charnov 2008, p. 238). For this reason, it would be reasonable to recognize that money alone cannot motivate employees. Instead, other non-monetary factors need to be incorporated in the motivation structure.

The McClelland’s acquired need theory claims that employees may acquire needs in their lines of duty. The argument is that people acquire needs throughout their lives and the needs are shaped by experiences. According to this theory, employees might be motivated to work hard because of what they want to achieve, power and affiliation. Employees that are motivated to work hard because of what they want to achieve in their lines of duty might do so to achieve their goals as well as company’s goals. Those motivated by affiliation might work hard to establish relation with others whereas those motivated by power might do so to take up higher ranking jobs so that they can control others (Daft & Lane 2008, p. 233). Understanding what motivates employees is very important in the process of developing strategies for motivating employees. It does not only motivate employees, but it also helps in understanding what needs to be done to motivate employees. Theoretically, it is the responsibility of those in leadership to understand the specific aspects that motivate employees for the sole purpose of aligning work environments with employees’ profiles (French 2011, p. 166).

With regard to equity theory, employees tend to relate their contributions to the companies they work for in relation to the reward systems. If they are convinced that they are rewarded fairly, they are likely to continue working the same way they work. Conversely, if they feel that they are not rewarded fairly, they are likely to lose interest in their works thereby reduce productivity (Bogardus 2007, p. 36). In order to deal with this issue, employers should ensure that they reward employees fairly. With regard to expectancy theory, employees might be motivated to work hard by the reward they expect to get once they accomplish what is expected of them. In this respect, employees might be tempted to calculate the effort they require to achieve particular rewards before they do what they do. If they are not convinced that the reward is worthwhile, they might not be motivated to work hard, and vice versa. Vroom argues that people start by evaluating their capabilities of completing assignments. If they are convinced that they can complete those assignments, they are motivated to complete those assignments by the rewards they achieve for doing so (Crouse 2005, p. 2). This means that the reward system is of great importance in motivating employees.

As for operant conditioning, employees can be motivated to work hard through four interventions. First, they might be motivated to work hard through positive reinforcement. Positive reinforcement in this case motivates employees to work hard by providing pleasant response when they work hard. For example, employees might be rewarded for increasing productivity in a company. Second, employees might be motivated to work hard through negative reinforcement. Negative reinforcement in this case refers to removal of unpleasant responses when employees work hard. Third, employees might be discouraged from failing to work hard through punishment. Fourth, they might be discouraged from failing to work hard through extinction (Bogardus 2007, p. 36).

Recommendation

Once the company recruit employees, it should focus its attention on retaining those employees. Evidences demonstrate that majority of the companies struggle to maintain employees because of the high competition. Aware of this fact, the company should not at any given time lose employees for treating them badly. At the same time, the company should not lose employees for not being proactive. Instead, it should be on the frontline leading other companies in the region. For these reasons, the company should utilize the following methods to retain its employees. First, the company should reward its employees handsomely. This does not mean that the company should spend all its money on wages and salaries, but it means that the company should try as much as possible to offer attractive wages and salaries. This would stop its employees from looking for jobs among its competitors. At the same time, it would encourage employees to be productive (Lauby 2005, p. 11). This notwithstanding, the wages and salaries should be based on employees’ productivity so that the company can be able to make more money. Employees’ productivity in this case means the amount of money employees are able to generate for the company. If employees are able to generate more money for the company, they should be paid high wages and salaries, and vice versa. As discussed earlier on, if the company would pay attractive wages and salaries, it would be able to motivate employees to remain in their jobs especially those concerned with meeting physiological needs and other minor needs. Based on this fact, the company should focus its attention on paying employees bonuses when they deserve to be paid. If need be, it might be forced to pay commissions with basic salaries so that it can motivate employees to work hard. At the same time, the company would be forced to develop a well-structured reward system that acknowledges the type of work of each employee. Although some experts downplay the role that money plays in motivating employees, it would be worthwhile noting that some employees especially the low level ones are motivated by money. Majority of these employees tend to measure the value that companies place on them on their wages and salaries. For this reason, it would be reasonable to pay these employees attractive wages and salaries or structure the pay scale in an attractive manner (Harunavamwe & Kanengoni 2013, 3931).       

Second, the company should develop a non-monetary motivation strategy. This structure unlike the former one should not be based on money. Instead, it should be based on incentives such as fully paid holidays for employees that outperform others, promotions and flexible working hours. The fact that the company should have specific working hours, it should have flexible working hours so that employees do not feel overwhelmed by the number of hours they have to work on daily basis. In this case, the company might allow employees to report before they are supposed to report and leave before they are supposed to leave so long as they meet their targets. At the same time, the company should not overwork employees so that it can gain unjustifiably. Instead, it should allow employees to work the normal working hours as labor laws in the country states. More importantly, the company should have good working conditions that are favorable to employees so that employees might be tempted to remain in the company throughout their lives unless they misbehave. With regard to promotions, the company should promote employees that outperform their targets. It should also increase the wages and salaries of its employees with a certain percentage probably 5 percent on annual basis. This would make employees feel cared for thereby purpose to remain in the company. Aware of the fact that some employees might not be after monetary gains because they might feel that they have achieved more than they need, the company should organize fully paid trips for its top management team as well as best performing employees. Such trips and holidays might motivate employees to work hard (Dlabay & Scott 2010, p. 234). It might as well make some employees stick in the company in the hope that they will be rewarded one day with such trips and holidays.

Third, the company should also focus its attention on developing the talents of its employees through trainings. Such trainings should be held after a given period of time and when need to hold them arises. The aim of these trainings should be to help employees improve their skills for the betterment of the company and employees’ performances (Werner & Desimone 2012, p. 310).

Budget proposal

The company would require a budget for its proposed project to ensure that its activities operate within some limits. Failing to develop a budget might render the company to utilizing more money than it expects to utilize. At the same time, it would limit the company from keeping records of its business activities. The budget would also help the company to label its activities for their easy management (Dinsmore & Cabanis-Brewin 2011, 101). It would also help the company to identify its immediate needs for the project so that it can plan for them. Based on the above understanding, there is no doubt that the company needs to develop a budget. The following will be the budget for the company. The first part covers the newspaper advertisements for the job openings. The second part of the budget deals with the reward system whereas the last part covers training cost and rental budget.   

Newspaper advertisement
1.The straits time500
2.My paper350
3.Today350
Reward system
1.Salaries and wages 
 5 Managers @ 1,500 each7,500
 295 employees @ 450 each132,750
2.Paid holidays2,500
3.Training 2,500
4.Rental60,000
5.Total206,450

Conclusion

Based on the above report, the company should advertise its job openings on three major national newspapers namely the straits times, my paper and today. This means that rather than advertising on one newspaper for the three days, the company should alternate its advertisements on the three newspapers. For example, if it advertises on the straits times on Friday, it should advertise on today’s newspaper on Saturday and on my paper on Sunday. This would help the company to reach more job applicants from different backgrounds. With the help of these newspaper advertisements, the company should invite potential job applicants to apply for its job openings. Upon receiving job application letters from job applicants, the company should invite job applicants for interviews and select the most qualified candidates from the applicants. In order to motivate and retain employees once it recruits them, the company should do the following. First, it should develop a reward system that is sensitive to employees’ immediate needs. Such a reward system would offer attractive wages and salaries. It should also offer bonuses to employees. Second, the company should develop a non-monetary motivation system that other than focusing its attention on money should focus its attention on incentives. Third, the company should develop training programs aimed at helping employees improve their skills. At the same time, the company should develop a budget for all its activities so that it can run its activities efficiently.

References

Barrett, R., 2003. Training, developing and motivating people. Cheltenham, Nelson Thornes.

Bogardus, A., 2007. PHR/SPHR: Professional in Human Resources certification study guide. Indianapolis: Sybex.

Cooper, D. & Robertson, I., 2001. Recruitment and selection: a framework for success. London, Thomson Learning.

Crouse, N., 2005. Motivation is an inside job: how to really get your employees to deliver the results you need. New York, iUniverse.

Daft, R. & Lane, P., 2008. The leadership experience. Mason, OH, Thomson/South-Western.

 Dinsmore, P. & Cabanis-Brewin, J., 2011. The AMA handbook of project management. New York, American Management Association.

Dlabay, L. & Scott, J., 2010. International business. Mason, Ohio, South-Western. 

French, R., 2011. Organizational behaviour. Hoboken, N.J., Wiley.

GEORGIADES, S. (2015). Employee engagement in media management: creativeness and organizational development. Cham, Switzerland: Springer.

Harunavamwe, M. & Kanengoni, H., 2013. The Impact of Monetary and Non-Monetary Rewards on Motivation among Lower Level Employees in Selected Retail Shops. African journal of business management, 7(38), pp. 3929-3935.

Larson, S. et al., 1998. Staff recruitment and retention: study results and intervention strategies. Washington, D.C., American Association on Mental Retardation.

Lauby, S., 2005. Motivating employees. Alexandria, Va, ASTD Press.

Montana, P. & Charnov, B., 2008. Management. Hauppauge, NY, Barron’s Educational Series.

Pride, W., Hughes, R. & Kapoor, J., 2010. Business. Australia, South-Western/Cengage Learning.

Warne, T., 2003. Recruiting and retaining individuals in state transportation agencies. Washington, D.C., Transportation Research Board.

Werner, J. & Desimone, R., 2012. Human resource development. Mason, OH, South-Western.