Sample English Paper on Rhetorical Analysis of Disney

Cover Letter

What I found to be a win in this process was that I was able to see how much of an impact Disney has on people’s lives. It was interesting to see how people react to certain aspects of the company and how it has shaped their lives in some way. I also found it fascinating to see how much of a global phenomenon Disney has become.

A struggle I found while writing the rhetoric analysis on Disney was trying to find a way to cover such a broad topic. Overall, though, I found the process to be a very interesting and insightful experience.

The most useful feedback I gave was on the opinion of Disney’s music and films and appreciating the hidden jokes in the films

The less useful feedback wasn’t that noticed but can say was about the target audience. This was less useful because of the obvious answer where the audience can include both young and adults

I think the analysis felt more like “process” writing because it required a lot more research and thought. I had to really think about what I wanted to say and how I was going to support my claims. In contrast, the literacy narrative was more personal and didn’t require as much planning.

 

I think I’ve grown as a writer through this semester by becoming more aware of the different ways to approach writing. I’ve also become more aware of the importance of planning and research when writing. I’ve also grown as a thinker by learning to critically analyze different texts and to see things from multiple perspectives.

 

Rhetorical Analysis of Disney

 

As you may know, Disney movies are considered to be fantasy films. Usually, fantasy

films are films with incredible topics, for the most part including enchantment, otherworldly

occasions, pretend animals, or colorful dreamlands. In many Walt Disney movies, the concept of

ethos, pathos, and logos are used not only to persuade and convince the audience, but it is also

used to comprehend or analyze the audience as well. Each of these concepts plays its role;

ethos is tied in with laying out your position to talk regarding the matter,

logos is your legitimate contention for your point and

pathos is your endeavor to influence a group of people sincerely.

Ethos

Ethos is all about credibility. To persuade your audience, you need to establish

credibility. This can be done by sharing your own experiences, using expert

testimonials, and generally appearing trustworthy.

Pathos

Pathos is all about emotion. To persuade your audience, you need to appeal to

their emotions. This can be done by sharing stories that evoke an emotional response,

using language that stirs up emotions, and generally speaking in a way that will resonate

with your audience emotionally.

Logos

Logos is all about logic. To persuade your audience, you need to present a logical

argument. This can be done by using facts and figures, by presenting a well-thought-out

the argument, and generally speaking in a way that makes sense to your audience.

Disney tends to use a lot of emotion to connect with its audience. They use classic

storytelling skills involved with modern takes to make engaging stories that hold their crowds’

attention and make sure it captures their imagination. Therefore, Disney can draw in a wide

crowd and guarantee success in its content. Songs from classic Disney films can create a

feeling of nostalgia or detailed familiarity with audiences. For example, “When You Wish Upon a Star” by Pinocchio has made many appearances in advertisements.

The music of Disney is often very advertisement and family-friendly. This is because Disney is a very family-oriented company. They want to make sure that their music is something that everyone can enjoy. This is why they often use classic songs that everyone knows and loves. For example, “When You Wish Upon a Star” by Pinocchio is a song many people know and love. It is a song that creates a feeling of nostalgia for many people. This is just one example of how Disney’s music is advertisement and family-friendly.

Almost all of Disney’s classical music has remained a major focal point for the company and an effective one. Pathos is Disney films’ most useful asset because it allows them to get individuals to feel something. Pathos also allows us to contemplate what another person may think. In Cinderella, we express sympathy towards her for the harsh treatment she gets from her stepmother and stepsisters. Therefore, our only hope is for her to marry the prince and hope for her stepmother’s downfall.

From the studies that have been done, it appears that children who watch Disney movies tend to be more sympathetic and kinder. There is no definitive answer as to whether these movies directly impact child development, but the research suggests that they can be beneficial. Disney movies have been shown to positively impact children in terms of their empathy and sympathy levels. While there is no definitive answer as to whether these movies directly impact child development, the research suggests that they can be beneficial. These findings align with other studies showing the benefits of exposure to media that portrays acts of kindness and helping behavior. For example, one study found that children who watched prosocial cartoons (i.e., those featuring characters helping others) were likelier to help a peer in need than those who watched neutral or antisocial cartoons. So why do Disney movies seem to have such a positive effect on kids? There are a few possible explanations. First, Disney movies often feature kind and helpful protagonists who provide good role models for children. Second, these movies often portray acts of kindness and helping behavior as being rewarded, which may encourage children to be more helpful themselves. Whatever the reason, the evidence suggests that Disney movies can positively impact children. So if you’re looking for a way to help your child develop empathy and sympathy, you may consider adding some Disney movies to your family’s viewing rotation.

While Disney appeals to the emotions of its audience of children, they understand they

have to also appeal to their parents. In many Disney films like Up or Finding Nemo, which are

more popular among parents and their children, there are some high-brow jokes that only

parents catch. Keeping both children and parents engaged. They use this with humor,

innuendos, logical reasoning, and sly tricks that the villains use. Because people understood

Disney would sneak jokes in, people developed an entire community of those who find and

discover so-called “Easter Eggs” an Easter egg is a message, image, or feature hidden in a

video game, a film, or another medium. So, this entire community spends hours and days

watching Disney films and movies, trying to catch and track the eggs. This is an interesting part of

Disney for adults as it puzzles them. See what they can catch, and compete to

find new eggs people haven’t discovered. In other words, whether it’s inferred swearing,

references to drugs and liquor, or sexual humor, Disney films are filled with jokes

that only grown-ups will comprehend. For instance, in Aladdin: The kings of thieves, at the point

when the ground begins to shake during Aladdin and Jasmine’s wedding party, Genie jests, “I

thought the earth wasn’t supposed to move until the honeymoon,” inferring what Aladdin and

Jasmine will probably get up on their special first night.

While some people may argue that Disney is teaching children inappropriate things by sneaking sexual innuendos into their films, others believe that it is simply adding a bit of fun for the adults watching the films with their children. Disney can appeal to children and adults by including these jokes, keeping everyone engaged in the film. Disney can sneak sexual innuendos into its films in a few different ways. One way is by using double entendres, phrases that can be interpreted in two different ways, one of which is usually sexual. For example, in The Little Mermaid, when Ariel is talking to Prince     Eric for the first time, she says, “I want to be where the people are, I want to see, want to see them dancin’… walkin’ around on those… what do you call them? Oh, feet!” By saying, “I want to see ’em dancin’… walkin’ around on those… feet”, Ariel is talking about dancing and walking, but the way she phrases it also makes it sound like she is talking about something else entirely. Another way that Disney can sneak sexual innuendos into its films is by using references to things that are traditionally considered to be sexual. For example, in The Little Mermaid, when Ursula, the sea witch, is trying to convince Ariel to sign her contract, she says, “Don’t underestimate the importance of body language!” and then proceeds to give Ariel a very suggestive look. This refers to the fact that body language is often used to communicate sexual interest, and Ursula is trying to show Ariel that she is interested in her. Overall, it is clear that Disney can sneak sexual innuendos into its films in various ways. While some may argue that this is inappropriate for children, others believe it simply adds a bit of fun for the adults who are watching the films with their children.

I have always loved Disney movies and music. As a child, I loved watching films and singing along to songs. I still enjoy Disney films and music as an adult, but I also appreciate the hidden jokes and innuendos aimed at adults. I think it’s great that Disney can appeal to children and adults with its films and songs. I also think it’s a lot of fun to try to find the hidden Easter eggs in the films. It’s something that I enjoy doing with my friends and family.

 My general opinion is that; I think Disney does a great job of using music to connect with its audience. I love the nostalgia I get when I hear classic songs from Disney movies. Additionally, I think the messages in many songs are very positive and uplifting, which is great for children to hear. The music is also catchy and easy to sing along to, making it perfect for commercials and other advertisements. Disney does a great job of using music to connect with its audience. The company uses traditional storytelling skills with modern takes to create engaging stories that capture the imagination. Also, Disney music is often upbeat, making it perfect for families and children. The music is also catchy and easy to sing along to, which makes it ideal for commercials and other advertisements.

Summary

Disney is one of the world’s most well-known and beloved entertainment companies. Founded in 1923, Disney has a long history of producing high-quality entertainment for children and adults. Over the years, Disney has maintained its reputation as a family-friendly company by producing wholesome and uplifting content. In recent years, however, Disney has been criticized for lacking diversity in its movies and TV shows. While the company has tried to address this issue, there is still room for improvement.

So, next time you watch a Disney film, take a closer look at the rhetoric used. From the

songs to the humor, there is more going on than meets the eye.

Conclusion

Disney’s music is very effective in drawing in a wide audience. The company uses traditional storytelling skills with modern takes to create engaging stories that capture the imagination. Also, Disney music is often upbeat, making it perfect for families and children. The music is also catchy and easy to sing along to, which makes it ideal for commercials and other advertisements.

 

 

 

Overall purpose:

This analysis examines Disney’s rhetoric to understand better how the company presents itself to the public. In particular, we will examine how Disney uses language to communicate its values and beliefs.

Target audience:

The target audience for this analysis is anyone interested in understanding how Disney presents itself to the world. This includes fans of Disney, as well as those who are critical of the company.

Key findings:

Some of the key findings of this analysis include the following:

-Disney uses language designed to appeal to a wide range of people.

-The company’s rhetoric is generally upbeat.

-Disney typically avoids using language that is controversial or polarizing.

 

 

Reference

Fisher, A. (2019, September 26). Rhetorical analysis of Disney. Retrieved from https://www.comm.colorado.edu/cfisher/6210/disney.htm