Sample Education Paper on Education: Summative Assessment

Education: Summative Assessment

Common core state standard

Before outlining the common core state standard (CCSS) for this unit, it is important to recall that this summative assessment relates to the American culture in 1900. It is also important to recall that students in this class are 7th grade students studying American literature. The students come from middle and low-income families because the school’s location is near a slum. As such, it is important to bear in mind the different needs for the students in the classroom because these students have different needs.  

The CCSS being assessed for mastery in this assessment will be the knowledge application for the unit’s reading materials in the current American literature. Therefore, as a teacher, I will be seeking to establish the extent at which each student can apply the knowledge he/she acquires from the unit in the contemporary American literature (Puckett, 2013).          

The unit’s goal

At the end of the unit, the students should be able to articulate the cultural and socio-economic differences between the contemporary American culture and the cultural practices of the 1900.

Measurable: This means that at the end of the unit students should be able to differentiate the current cultural practices from those cultural practices of the 1900. The students will be able to do this by making clear distinctions between the lives of the Americans in 1900 and their lives today. If the students will not be in a position to articulate such distinctions, then they will not have grasped the important aspects of the unit (Militello, Schweid, & Sireci, 2010). On the contrary, if the students will articulate such distinctions, then they will have grasped the important aspects of the unit.   

Specific outcome: at the end of the unit, students should be able to distinguish the cultural and socio-economic practices of the 1900 from the current ones.

Measureable progress: Accordingly, every student that masters the CCSS should be in a position to complete an assessment project at the end of the unit.

Proficiency level: At the same time, such a student should be able to display high level of understanding of the unit by scoring over 75 percent of the marks.        

Formative assessment

First day: pre-test

For the first day, I will simply seek to know my students rather than introduce the unit. Therefore, I will be interested in establishing whether the students have any idea about the unit. I will also be interested in determining the students’ interest for the unit and their preferred mode of learning. Consequently, I will start my lesson by pre-testing the students’ interest and readiness for the unit by asking the students some few questions about the unit. I will also ask them to choose their most preferred mode of learning from among the modes I will provide to them. In this case, I will simply issue the students with papers containing some few questions related to the unit. Those papers will seek to establish whether the students have any idea about the unit and their interests in the unit. The papers will also ask the student to choose one mode of learning from among the many modes that I will provide on the paper. After students respond to my questions, I will then collect the papers from them and analyze the answers they will provide to me. The process of analyzing the answers will involve grouping the students into different groups based on the responses they will provide to me (Brighton, 2009). By this I will be able to determine the best mode of learning for my students, their interests and the information they already have concerning the unit. Therefore, on one hand, the pre-test will help me in determining the suitable learning style for my students as well as the differentiated teaching strategy that will be suitable for my students. On the other hand, the pre-test will help me in addressing the multiple intelligences among my students as well as guide me in understanding where I should start in teaching the students.

Second day: interest survey

On the second day, my interest will be to introduce the unit without teaching substantial issues to the students. Therefore, I will only highlight important aspects of the unit, and introduce the major topics in the unit to be covered on the third day. Upon introducing the unit, my interest will then shift to identifying the interests of the students on the topics I will introduce to them. In order to assess the interest of my students in the major topics and in the unit, I will then make use of the interest survey. The interest survey will involve writing down all the topics that we will cover in the unit and then asking the students to organize them in order of preference. In this case, the first topic will be the most preferred topic for the unit while the last topic will be the last topic to cover in class (Brighton, 2009). However, before the students engage in this exercise, I will expect them to master all the key concepts of the unit as well as understand the significant issues in the unit. Once I gather this information from the students, then I will determine the teaching strategy that I will use in teaching the student on the third day. I will also determine the appropriate learning styles for my students.

Third day: exit cards

On the third day, my interest will be to teach the unit based on the prior knowledge I will have acquired from the first and second days’ experiences. Therefore, I will not spend more time on the issues that students already know even though I will touch them from time to time. I will also take care of the various needs for the students that I will have identified from the pre-test and interest survey.

Accordingly, the exit card will be my main assessment tool for the third day. This will be a simple slip of paper that will contain pre-determined prompts that I will prepare a day before teaching the students. The paper will simply ask the students to highlight four main things they will have learned at the end of the lesson. It will also ask the students to write down any question they might have in relation to what we will cover that day (Adams, & Pierce, 2006). I will not issue the students with the exit cards at the start of the lesson, but I will issue them with these cards at the end of the lesson. The intention will be to allow the students learn without interfering with them and then test their rates of understanding important issues in the unit later on. Once the students respond to the exit cards, I will ask them to deposit those cards in a box I will place at the door.  

Once I collect the exit cards from the box, I will sort the cards based on the responses contained in them. By so doing, I will be in a position to identify the possible needs my students might have in understanding the unit. The process of identifying the needs for my student will involve identifying the areas that many students will have not understood by gauging the responses they will provide. Once I identify the needs, I will then develop a unique differentiated teaching strategy for the students (Dodge, 2009). The differentiated teaching strategy will take care of the multiple intelligences in my class by guiding me in choosing the right teaching and learning styles for my students.

Summative assessment

The summative assessment will be the last thing to utilize in capturing the manner in which the students understand the unit. This process will come at the end of the unit rather than coming as the teaching process continues. For this reason, the summative assessment will seek to know the key issues the students will have acquired from the unit as well as the application of the knowledge they will have acquired during the learning process. In this case, I will ask the students to prepare power point presentations for the unit and submit them to me. I will also ask the students to present those power point presentations to other students in the classroom on the last day of the unit. Each student will have five minutes to present his/her work.

With regard to directions of completing the project, I will provide the students with those directions the same day they will be completing the assessment project. However, at the start of the unit, I will inform the students that they will complete such a project at the end of the unit. I will do this because the intention will not be to evaluate the performance of the students in the unit, but to assess their understanding of the unit. In other words, the marks awarded to the students will help in assessing their understanding of the topic rather than gauging their performances on the same (Adams, & Pierce, 2006).

The following will be the rubric for grading the students.

Criteria 100 points 75 points 50 points 25 points
Ability to identify important points in the unit The student identifies more than five important points in the presentation  The student identifies four important points in the presentation The student identifies three important points in the presentation The student identifies less than two important points in the presentation
Creativity The student portrays high level of creative The student is somewhat creative The student is less creative The student does not portray any level of creativity
Level of understanding The student makes clear distinctions between the current culture and the 1900 culture  The student understands the unit and shows some level of distinctions of the two cultures  The student understands the unit, but does not distinguish between the two cultures clearly The student does not portray clear distinctions between current culture and the 1900 culture
Grammar Does not have any grammatical errors Contains less than three grammatical errors Contains between four and six grammatical errors Contains more than seven grammatical errors

Responses to the write-up material

With regard to the write-up material, I do not think teachers usually consider the differences between the way male and female students learn when they are assessing them. My assumption is that when assessing students most teachers want to establish whether students in their classrooms understand what they teach them or not rather than finding out the difference between the ways the two groups of students learn. The basis of my assumption and argument is the fact that in almost all cases teachers do not have two different sets of rubrics for assessing the two groups of students. Instead, they usually have one set of rubric to assess the students. At the same time, when teachers conduct formative assessments, they do not care whether a student is a male or a female student in sorting out the responses they obtain from them. Mostly, teachers groups students in the same groups without determining whether a student is a male or female student. Based on this argument, I do not think teachers consider the differences between the way male and female students learn even if it is paramount to do it (Morgan, 2007). Instead, they assess their students using same criteria.     

References

Adams, C., & Pierce, R. (2006). Differentiating instruction: A practical guide to tiered lessons in the elementary grades. Waco, Tex: Prufrock Press.

Brighton, C. (2009). Pre-assessment in the differentiated classroom. Retrieved on September 24, 2014 from http://www.diffcentral.com/examples/brighton_preassess.pdf  

Dodge, J. (2009). 25 quick formative assessments for a differentiated classroom. Retrieved on September 24, 2014 from http://store.scholastic.com/content/stores/media/products/samples/21/9780545087421.pdf

Militello, M., Schweid, J., & Sireci, S. (2010). Formative assessment systems: evaluating the fit between school districts’ needs and assessment systems’ characteristics. Educ Asse Eval Acc, 22, 29-52.

Morgan, L. (2007). How gender affects learning. Retrieved on September 27, 2014 from https://www.parentmap.com/article/how-gender-affects-learning 

Puckett, K. (2013). Differentiating instruction: a practical guide. San Diego, CA: Bridgepoint Education.