RELIGIOUS STUDIES SAMPLE PAPER ON LITERARY/HISTORICAL NATURE OF THE PRIMEVAL NARRATIVES

LITERARY/HISTORICAL NATURE OF THE PRIMEVAL NARRATIVES

Introduction

The Bible starts with the acclaimed line “In the beginning, God made the sky and the earth.[1]” This sentence attests a vital conviction of Jewish and Christian confidence, the conviction that the God of the Jews and Christians is the creator of the world. So why have researchers wrangled over the importance of this line for a considerable length of time? Furthermore, why has it turned into a wedge issue in the present day fight between scriptural conviction and current science? To have the capacity to answer these inquiries, we have to peruse the content and read it. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the type of literature and history, which pose compelling issues for Genesis 1-11 and raise troublesome questions pertaining to the Bible. What sort of literature can be attributed to this chapter? It is true to say that it is prose or poetry, history or story.

The Primeval Story takes us back in time to extreme causes, subsequently the term primeval. The story takes us to the earliest conceivable time, the time of inestimable beginnings, where people witness the framing of the world where life can flourish. The precise first expressions of the Hebrew content, bereshit, “before all else,” turned into the book’s scriptural name[2]. Afterward, the book of Genesis narrates the starting point of the country of Israel by effecting stories of its precursors. Genesis is brimming with stories that have ended up so critical in the Western world that it will take us two sections to unpack it. For this reason, Genesis 1–11 is known as the Primeval Narratives.

 

Literary Nature

The style of Genesis 1 is amazing for its straightforwardness and its economy of dialect[3]. Yet to ask whether it is composition or verse is a genuine distortion. Despite the fact that we do not find here the synonymous parallelism and rhythms of Hebrew verse, the section has various similar-sounding word usages. The conspicuousness of redundancy and of its result brings the composition near poetry; its development to a peak puts it in the order of exposition. Here and there, it is called a “song,” it gives off the impression of being a remarkable mix of exposition and poems[4]. In spite of the fact that it has no hint of talk, the entry does use allegorical dialect for portraying God’s action: humanoid attributions that speak to God as though he were an individual talking and seeing, working and resting. Yet the conclusion that Genesis 1-11 is semi-poetic and has non-literal dialect in no way decides the principle question and the association of the story with genuine occasions.

Historical Nature

In the beginning, it must be clear that verifiable records outside of the Bible and archeological information provide practically no assistance with these sections. People cannot date any of these occasions, nor would they be able to relate the occasions portrayed in the Primeval History to any occasion outside of the Bible[5]. This sort is a strict history. Numerous Christians accept this position, as these sections describe occasions that truly happened in humankind’s history. Notwithstanding, such a position brings up numerous unanswerable issues:  the occasions described here are not a piece of the actuality that we encounter. Snakes do not talk (Chap 3); individuals do not live to be several years of age; heavenly attendants (children of God seen in Gen 6:1-4) do not engage in sexual relations with human women and produce a race of goliaths. Truly, there is no extra-biblical certification for these occasions[6].

What were the circumstances of the Israelites who accepted the message of Genesis, particularly social and nature? The response to that address depends to an extensive degree on specific presumptions about the initiation and date of the record[7]. Two fundamental methodologies have commanded the elucidation of Genesis throughout the most recent century.

One position rejects the Mosaic creation and early date of the Pentateuch alongside its celestial impulse and reliability[8]. The developmental perspective of the nineteenth century treated those five books as the climax of a long methodology of social development. It expected that socially and religiously, humanity has traveled through advancing states from brutality to civilization. Yet, as new information given by archaic exploration had a tendency to dishonor that view[9], the similar religion model has to be progressively prevalent. It holds Genesis 1-11 to be a Jewish acquiring and adjustment of the religions of neighboring countries. Both perspectives think about the Pentateuch to be composing of obscure creators or redactors (editors) long after Moses, likely late in the time of the Hebrew government.

Conclusion

The Primeval History is the account of prevalent early period, aligned with Israel’s story. Researchers identify these sections as the Primeval History “pertaining to the initial phases.” These sections hold stories of Israel’s perspective of the primary phases of the creation and the primary phases of humankind. These constitute a wide setting for Israel’s story, which is the main concern for the Old Testament. The historic-creative understanding of Genesis 1-11 does equal its literary structure and id generally consistent with the scripture’s viewpoint on regular occasions.

 

 

 

Bibliography

Brodie, Thomas L. 2001. Genesis as dialogue a literary, historical, and theological commentary.

New York: Oxford University Press, 44.

Chen, Y. S. 2013. The primeval flood catastrophe: origins and early development in

            Mesopotamian traditions, 102.

Coats, George W. 1983. Genesis: with an introduction to narrative literature. Grand Rapids,

Mich. [u.a.]: Eerdmans, 76.

Edwards, Denis. 1999. The God of evolution: a Trinitarian theology. New York: Paulist Press, 3.

Gonzales, Robert R. 2009. Where sin abounds: the spread of sin and the curse in the Book of

Genesis with a special focus on the patriarchal narratives. Eugene, Or: Wipf & Stock Publishers, 230.

Hayes, John H. 1971. Introduction to the Bible. Philadelphia: Westminster Press, 67.

Longman, Tremper, 2009. How to Read the Genesis. Downers Grove:  Intervarsity Press, 41-90.

Oden, Robert A. 2000. The Bible without theology: the theological tradition and alternatives to

  1. it. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press, 56.

Rad, Gerhard von. 2001. Old Testament theology. Louisville, KY: Westminster John Knox Press.

Van Till, Howard J. 1986. The fourth day: what the Bible and the heavens are telling us about

            the creation. Grand Rapids, Mich: William B. Eerdmans Pub. Co.

Walton, John H., and Kelly Lemon Vizcaino. 2012. Job: the NIV Application Commentary from

            biblical text … to contemporary life. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 67-145.

[1] Chen, Y. S. 2013. The primeval flood catastrophe: origins and early development in

Mesopotamian traditions, 44.

[2] Walton, John H., and Kelly Lemon Vizcaino. 2012. Job: the NIV Application Commentary from biblical

text … to contemporary life. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 201.

 

[3] Hayes, John H. 1971. Introduction to the Bible. Philadelphia: Westminster Press, 38.

[4] Rad, Gerhard von. 2001. Old Testament theology. Louisville, KY: Westminster John Knox Press, 79.

[5] Oden, Robert A. 2000. The Bible without theology: the theological tradition and alternatives to

  1. it. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press, 102.

 

[6] Longman, Tremper, 2009. How to Read the Genesis. Downers Grove:  Intervarsity Press, 76.

[7] Edwards, Denis. 1999. The God of evolution: a Trinitarian theology. New York: Paulist Press, 30.

[8] Chen, Y. S. 2013. The primeval flood catastrophe: origins and early development in

Mesopotamian traditions, 232.

[9] Brodie, Thomas L. 2001. Genesis as dialogue a literary, historical, and theological commentary.

New York: Oxford University Press, 54.