Nursing Annotated Bibliography Paper Sample on Nurses’ role in medication safety

Annotated Bibliography

Choo, J., Hutchinson, A., & Bucknall, T. (2010). Nurses’ role in medication safety. Journal of nursing management, 18(7), 853-861.

The article explores the vital role that nurses play in the process of medication management. It identifies different challenges associated with safe medication management in modern clinical practice. Medication errors being one of most common factors affecting patient safety has been discussed broadly. The nursing profession has been brought out as vital to the promotion and protection of patients’ safety. The article provides a broad review of literature on medication error and the significant application of electronic prescribing in medication errors.

The article explores various aspects that entail the role played by nurses in the medication safety. These include review on medical error, challenges that face medication administration, human errors associated with medication administration, implications for nurse managers’ framework for analyzing medication administration errors, and factors that affect medication safety, such as work environment factors, team factors, and patient factors. Multiple decision making points within the medical administration process are considered the reasons that increase the potential of making errors. The article discusses how these factors significantly influence vital decision making in the nursing profession.

The article has captured broad aspects that affect clinical practice and as a result contribute towards clinical errors. Contributory factors, such as insufficient priority given by regulators to safety issues, lack of proper awareness of safety issues, heavy workloads in healthcare professions, poor communication among different professions within the healthcare (such as physicians and nurses), inadequate administrative support, limited access to essential clinical equipments, lack of knowledge or experience and proper training, unavailability of test results or delay in getting them, language barriers between patients and clinical staffs, legal pressures against open discussion, and  poor cross cultural skills.

Leppänen, V. (2010). Power in telephone‐advice nursing. Nursing inquiry, 17(1), 15-26.

The article presents a suitable structure through which a reader can understand how power operates in social interaction between nurse professionals and callers in telephone-advice nursing in primary care in Sweden. Power is analyzed in consideration of five social structures within nurses and caller relationship, which include the structure of social interaction, the institution of telephone-advice nursing, the specialist division of labor division between doctors and nurses, the social stock of medical knowledge and the structure of emotions. Though there are structural constraints that govern the processes involved, the calling center is a free room that allows nurses to exercise their creativity. The article captures the inclusion of new technology of control, which includes audio recording of calls and computerized decision support system. The significance of these inclusions is vital for better effective customer service and quick service delivery. The empirical data includes 276 audio-recorded telephone call in six primary-care centers and comprehensive qualitative interviews with 18 nurses.

The study reveals that nurses and patients’ freedom of action is constrained in various forms by being dependent to these structures, but the organization of telephone-advice nursing provides them a ‘free room’ that contains some leeway to operate more creatively. Power has been portrayed as the central aspect in nursing, especially in telephone-advice nursing, where nurses engage callers over the telephone to help tackle different medical problems and make appropriate decisions on suitable measures that should be taken. The article comprehensively focuses on the consequences brought about by quality control systems within the telephone advising-nursing.

Katriina, P., Sari, V., Anja, R., Christina, S., Paula, A., & Tarja, S. (2013). Nursing power as viewed by nursing professionals. Scandinavian journal of caring sciences, 27(3), 580-588.

The article presents the perception of the level of nursing group power in public healthcare institutions from the nursing professional perspective. It carefully analyzes the interconnection between the background variables and nursing group power. The article reveals the essence of power in the nursing profession as a vital resource that can help them achieve nursing goals effectively. The article begins with a focused examination of the concept of power with vital definitions that provide better understanding of the meaning of power in the nursing profession. It maintains that nurses without power are ineffective and less motivated when conducting their jobs. The study identifies six factors associated with power, which includes authority, self-confidence, organizational structure, organizational culture, professional skills, and supportive management. Having significant influence on the decision making process with some autonomous capacity on nursing issue is important in the provision of nursing care.

The study suggests that there is a need to examine and give clearer definition of the nursing job description. This would significantly help the nursing professionals to understand the power within their profession to achieve the expected goals in healthcare.  There is a need for healthcare organization to allow autonomous nursing practice to break oppressive approaches used by healthcare institutions, physicians, and administrators. The article identifies vital characteristics of professional nursing power that nurses believe are vital at individual level. The study maintains that powerless nurses work with little motivation and are more susceptible to depersonalization. Insufficiency of resources has been identified as the main problem within the healthcare. The article proposes a reformed management practice that would be able to support effective nursing practice in the modern environment. The article’s contribution is significant in understanding how nurses can make use of the power within their profession to make appropriate decisions. The article identifies vital benefits of empowering nurses in making autonomous decisions.

Wittenberg-Lyles, E., Goldsmith, J., & Ferrell, B. (2013). Oncology nurse communication barriers to patient-centered care. Clinical journal of oncology nursing17(2).

The article explores in depth the communication barriers from the view of seven nurse managers in the bid to identify vital communication skills necessary for oncology nurses when practicing patient-centered-care. To identify barriers to patients and family, the study used the thematic analysis approach. Success in the nursing profession has been attributed to effective communication between nurse and patient, physician, and families. The article reveals that majority of the nurse managers reached a consensus on the fact that difficulties in communication between nurses and patients originate from inconsistent messages given to patients and their families by healthcare staffs. Such misleading information can result in significant damage that can negatively affect the patients and families. The essence of effective communication has been identified as the central aspect behind successful nursing and better patient-centered care.

The factors that would cause communication barrier for ecology nurses include fear of death, poor task orientation, and low self-awareness of verbal and non-verbal communication.  The study identifies two prominent barriers to patient-centered communication, which include lack of consistency in communication from healthcare staff, and physician expectations about nurses. There seem to be a divide between physicians and nurses that extends to affect the patients and families that get information from uncertain nurses. Effective communication in nursing profession minimizes medical era and promotes positive patient outcomes in the patient-centered care. The study suggested that nurse professionals should be thoroughly equipped with vital tools to receive training on how to communicate with patients and families. The article points out the nurse-physician communication as a significant factor that influences patient centered care. The article captures vital nursing aspects that include patient-centered communication skills, key concept about communication in nursing profession, and implications for Nurse Training and Practice.   

References

Choo, J., Hutchinson, A., & Bucknall, T. (2010). Nurses’ role in medication safety. Journal of nursing management, 18(7), 853-861.

Katriina, P., Sari, V., Anja, R., Christina, S., Paula, A., & Tarja, S. (2013). Nursing power as viewed by nursing professionals. Scandinavian journal of caring sciences, 27(3), 580-588.

Leppänen, V. (2010). Power in telephone‐advice nursing. Nursing inquiry, 17(1), 15-26.

Wittenberg-Lyles, E., Goldsmith, J., & Ferrell, B. (2013). Oncology nurse communication barriers to patient-centered care. Clinical journal of oncology nursing17(2).