Astronomy Essay Paper on Sampling

SAMPLING

Sampling and census are two approaches used to collect and analyze information about a characteristic or an entire group of a particular population. Whereas sampling focuses on the representative units from the population, census considers the whole group under investigation and every conclusion is drawn from specific characteristics of every member of the population.[1] The decision to use census and not sampling or vice-versa depends on constraint factors such as the time frame, the cost of study, the level of precision required, behavior change of the groups under investigation and the level of accuracy required.[2] As per the case provided, conducting a comprehensive survey on 1400 employees within a period of one week may be possible either way depending on the available factors. Holding the mentioned factors constants, sampling approach becomes more convenient than census since through sampling, factors such as cost and time of study is are reduced while efficiency, sufficiency and accuracy of information is enhanced.

Time and cost are the most specific factors that pose greater impact on the kind of data a statistician draws from a huge population like in the case given. Collecting information from a population of 1400 employees might prove difficult if there is no proper planning at the initial stage. Sampling requires that the whole population is divided into sample units, and a unit picked at random to represent the entire population. Focusing of a specific representative unit for this investigation reduces the times of study. As already stated, the survey must be within one week, which is not a long duration as a person may have thought. Conducting the survey within the allocated time can only be possible if representative samples are used.[3] Other than time, the investigation requires that every information laid for analysis must be well searched within the timeframe. Sampling therefore enhances data accuracy since the research is in a position of interacting with every member within the sample unit.

Bibliography

Kowalewski, Milton J., and Josh B. Tye. 2011. Statistical sampling: past, present, and future theoretical and practical. Philadelphia, PA: ASTM.

Nargundkar, Rajendra. 2008. Marketing research: text and cases. New Delhi: Tata McGraw-Hill.  


[1] Nargundkar, Rajendra. Marketing research: text and cases. (New Delhi: Tata McGraw-Hill, 2008), p. 23. 

[2] Kowalewski, Milton J., and Josh B. Tye. Statistical sampling: past, present, and future theoretical and practical. (Philadelphia, PA: ASTM, 2011), p. 12-25.

[3] Nargundkar, Rajendra. Marketing research: text and cases. (New Delhi: Tata McGraw-Hill, 2008), p. 23.